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Winter? What winter? Sarnians gardening and golfing in February

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Journal Staff

Asked to comment on the split decision coming from a group of grumpy groundhogs on Feb. 2, at least one Environment Canada meteorologist had a more sensible question:

Forget spring, he said. When is winter going to arrive?

Thus far, Sarnians have been spared the cold and snow accumulations of a typical southern Ontario winter.

Snow shovels have seen little action, dust is settling on piles of cross-country skis and this weekend’s annual ice fishing derby on Sarnia Bay has been cancelled for lack of ice.

December featured green grass and flowering dandelions. Lawnmowers were heard in a few neighbourhoods, and some picked herbs from the garden for their Christmas feast.

The St. Clair River and Lake Huron are still largely ice-free and freighters continue to pass beneath the Blue Water Bridge, carrying road salt to communities that don’t really need it.

Then, last week, in what should have been the dead of winter, the temperature soared to coat-shedding heights. In Sarnia, where it officially hit 14.8 C. and was higher in some places, golfers took to the links and the adventurous headed to Canatara beach to sit in the sun and walk on unfrozen sand.

The forecast is calling for a return of colder temps this week. But whatever happens from here on out the winter of 2015-16 has already been one for the record books.

Seagulls congregate on and over the thin ice of Sarnia Bay. The Bluewater Anglers ice fishing derby set for Saturday has been cancelled this year, and isn't being rescheduled.
Seagulls congregate on and over the thin ice of Sarnia Bay. The Bluewater Anglers ice fishing derby set for Saturday has been cancelled this year, and isn’t being rescheduled.

 

Mike Shearon keeps his eye on a ball after hitting an iron at the Sarnia Golf and Curling Club on Feb. 3.
Mike Shearon keeps his eye on a ball after hitting an iron at the Sarnia Golf and Curling Club on Feb. 3.

 

Sarnia's Penny Green catches some rays and Vitamin D while enjoying the scenery at Canatara Park beach last week. Walking the shoreline were Nicholas, Jamie and Benjamin Lupaschuk, from Indiana, and Jeanette Lupaschuk of Alberta, who were visiting relatives in Sarnia.
Sarnia’s Penny Green catches some rays and Vitamin D while enjoying the scenery at Canatara Park beach last week. Walking the shoreline were Nicholas, Jamie and Benjamin Lupaschuk, from Indiana, and Jeanette Lupaschuk of Alberta, who were visiting relatives in Sarnia.
Al Duffy shows a strawberry plant still growing outside last week. Glenn Ogilvie
Al Duffy shows a strawberry plant still growing outside last week.
Glenn Ogilvie
Al Duffy, a member of One Tomato, was thrilled to get a jump on gardening last week, when he rototilled a space on Mitton Street.  Duffy intends to plant 150 tomato plants along with cucumbers, lettuce, peppers and herbs, with the produce going to the Inn of the Good Shepard for distribution.  Glenn Ogilvie
Al Duffy, a member of One Tomato, was thrilled to get a jump on gardening last week, when he rototilled a space on Mitton Street. Duffy intends to plant 150 tomato plants along with cucumbers, lettuce, peppers and herbs, with the produce going to the Inn of the Good Shepard for distribution.
Glenn Ogilvie
The digital thermometer at New Horizons Community Church on Russell Street registers the temperature shortly before noon on Wednesday, Feb 3. A new official record was set that day of 14.8 C.
The digital thermometer at New Horizons Community Church on Russell Street registers the temperature shortly before noon on Wednesday, Feb 3. A new official record was set that day of 14.8 C.

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