Prevost adds weightlifting record to athletic resume

Sarnia’s Carolyne Prevost poses with fellow competitor Hafthor Bjornsson at the Arnold Classic in Ohio earler this month. Submitted Photo

Troy Shantz

Sarnia multi-sport athletic wonder Carolyne Prevost has added another honour to her long list of accomplishments.

Prevost set a new Rogue World Record at the annual Arnold Classic Strongman competition in Columbus, Ohio earlier this month when she completed 63 separate 225-pound deadlifts.

She wasn’t the strongest woman at a single lift, she said.

“But I could cycle the weight faster than the other girls and just have better endurance overall for the two minutes.”

The feat earned her a prize of $5,000 U.S. ($7,238 CDN).

Prevost was one of 10 women to qualify and earned the invite through a video tryout. She had the highest qualifying score with 57 reps, she said.

“Going in I knew I had a good shot at establishing the new record,” she said, noting the second-place finisher did 45 reps.

Co-founded by actor and bodybuilder Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Arnold Classic began in 1987 as a bodybuilding festival but now includes strongman and powerlifting events. It drew 22,000 athletes in hundreds of events.

“I’ll try to beat (the record) next year. I feel like I could beat it with a little bit more specific training,” said Prevost. “I’m sure more females will try to enter the competition (next year). Obviously they have the number to beat now.”

A world record in weightlifting is only the latest accomplishment for the Saint-François-Xavier School grad, who may be the best all-round athlete Sarnia has ever produced.

She finished first among Canadians at the CrossFit Games in Wisconsin last year and #13 overall in the world.

She competed as a teen at the Canadian junior national level in three sports — soccer, taekwondo and hockey.
And she has won 11 national championships in four different sports.

She played forward with the Toronto Furies in the defunct Canadian Women’s Hockey League (CWHL), and is now part of the Professional Women’s Hockey Association – which is attempting to jump-start a new league with better pay for players.

Because of the COVID-19 virus scare, she is off from her job as a teacher and her gym is closed. So she’s finding creative ways to stay fit at her Toronto apartment.
She has weights and is recording videos of workouts for fellow members of her gym, she said.

“It’s a weird time for us as an athlete right now for multiple sports,” Prevost said.

“It’s just about adapting. Right now health is more important than competition.”