Letters: week of Oct. 22

Irked by speeders, dangerous sidewalks

Sir: In moving to Corunna I have found two major problems.

Number one is the drag strip known as Hill Street. Residents have put up signs that say, “slow down,” but they’ve been worthless.

Number two, the sidewalks from the Park to the St. Clair Parkway. They are a complete and dangerous mess. If a woman walked them in high-heels she wouldn’t make it to the corner without breaking one.

Years ago, they ground down some of the high points, probably for the kids riding their bikes back and forth. But given the amount of taxes that are levied, you would assume that one day they’d replace these sidewalks.

I have spoken to a councillor about it and she said we don’t have the money for it.

If this were the City of Toronto, the lawsuits from people walking these sidewalks would bankrupt the municipality.

 

Gary Avery
Corunna

 


 

Take it or leaf it

Sir: As a resident of Sarnia, I offer a “Bravo” to the Village of Point Edward council for its grass and leaf pick-up schedule.

It happens every Monday, commencing April 1 and continuing through to Nov. 30, for the entire eight- month period. Every Week!

Point Edward council has displayed the foresight to address the needs of every taxpayer in the village.

This Sarnian gives a huge shout of approval, “Well done!”

Sincerely,

 

Alice Frew
Sarnia

 


 

Much better to light a candle than curse the dark

Sir: I have a simple idea. Let’s as a community show some hope during this difficult year by having every home put up some Christmas lights.

The lights can remind us to be more forgiving, charitable, supportive, and loving towards all in our wonderful city.

We’re in this together, so let’s light up Sarnia and show every person counts and that hope can change everything.

 

Desiree Hillman
Sarnia

 


Why are overloud motorcycles allowed?

Sir: Six month ago the harbingers of spring arrived, with bird song everywhere, the scent of moist earth, and the first hint of the green buds forthcoming in the trees.

But another annual accession came to our waiting ears, one that was more an assault on the senses. I refer, of course, to the annual onslaught of motorcycles filling the air with their unrestrained and guttural thunder of cacophonous engines.

Cars, trucks and motorcycles must, by law, have some form of sound reduction device on their exhaust to be legally compliant with noise bylaws.

Yet we’re subjected to these odious vehicles as their growling, whining, roaring engines race between Lite Street and Christina, up to Michigan and Christina, and, for that matter, all through Sarnia. These machines are ubiquitous at all hours as they race at will unhindered.

The need for a roaring motorcycle must have something to do with its owner’s primeval need to express masculinity by being faster, stronger, bigger and, most annoyingly, louder.

No bylaw enforcement, Police Chief Hansen? Pity. Thank heaven it will be winter soon.

 

Paul Pinel
Sarnia