Letters: week of April 19

Millions of children have been lost to abortion

Sir: Many babies have died in our local hospital, yet this never makes the papers.

These babies never had their pictures in the local obituaries. No parents wrote loving tributes to a tiny life. These babies were not even given the dignity of a name. They were aborted.

They joined the nameless bodies of three million other babies that have been aborted from 1974 to 2010 in Canada (see AbortioninCanada.ca, Annual Abortion Rates).

How I mourn for these children that never had a chance to grow up.  Sincerely,

C.B. Eagles
Sarnia

 


 

Organ donation by Humboldt Broncos player an inspire to others

Sir: Regarding the Humboldt Bronco’s tragedy and Logan Boulet’s gift of life decision.

It is almost impossible to find any positives in the recent, senseless loss of life caused by the bus crash in Saskatchewan. But there is one — Logan Boulet’s very mature and considered decision to sign up as an organ donor.

Logan Boulet did everything right when he signed his organ donor card. Most significant, he took the time to speak to his family and make his wishes clear to them.

In turn, the family’s decision to respect his wishes is why his incredible “Gift of Life” has benefitted so many grateful recipients and their families!

So, please, everyone considering signing up to be an organ donor, and those who are already signed up, do not forget the most important step of all. Talk to your family and make your wishes clear. Have the conversation while you are alive and make it an on-going dialogue with your family as years go by.

At the time of crisis, if your family says no to organ donation, even if you have signed a card, the hospital will do as they say and your effort will be in vain.

By keeping the dialogue open, we will, with time, eliminate the need for long organ donor wait lists and save lives.

Peace and Blessings to Logan’s family! This remarkable young man will live on forever because of this simple, selfless decision.

Sincerely,

Claudette Gasbarini
Sarnia


 

The eternal gospel does not require an everlasting sermon

Sir: I don’t think I’m alone in wondering why Ricky Religious and his microphone can broadcast his beliefs from the southeast corner of the busy London-Murphy intersection.

Recently, a south-bound pedestrian walked 20 feet east of the marked crosswalk to avoid this intimidating, sidewalk-blocking, blabby-bully.

His time spent collecting the pretty little bags of dog logs along the Howard Watson trail would find him a much more appreciating audience.

Doug Hacking 
Sarnia


 

Korean War veteran was a warrior and a gentleman

Sir: It was with sadness I was advised of William “Bill” Oldale’s passing on April 6.

I called Bill a friend for many years and enjoyed his humour and friendly smile, regardless of the situation at hand.

He was a true mentor to me and only asked respect in return. Bill was very close-lipped about his exemplary military service, but with some coaching you could learn about some of the hardships he endured, as well as the camaraderie he shared with his fellow members of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Regiment.

It is 67 years minus 16 days that Bill faced insurmountable odds against the Chinese Army on Hill 677 in Korea, as The Journal related in a February story.

Fortunately, he survived the encounter and returned home. Bill was a true warrior and a gentleman and we who were privileged to know him give thanks for his service and his friendship.

“We will remember him”

Douglas Neely
Point Edward


 

What’s really driving up gas prices isn’t Cap & Trade

Sir: I was horrified to see the price of regular gasoline at $133.9 a litre in Sarnia today (April 11), and a quick scan of Gasbuddy indicated prices were within two cents across the city.

Some would-be politicians would like us to believe that such prices are the result of Ontario’s Carbon Cap & Trade program, but it’s worth reminding ourselves that Cap and Trade only added a little over four cents to the cost of a litre.

With oil trading at $66 a barrel and the price at the pumps similar to that when oil was $100, it is quite clear who is hosing the consumer, and it’s the oil companies.

Any politician who really wanted to protect consumers would be fighting the oil companies, not threatening to undermine efforts to address global warming.

Peter R. Smith
Sarnia